Phil Friedman

5 years ago · 2 min. reading time · visibility ~10 ·

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Saving Serious Weight in Yacht and Boat Interiors

SAVING SERIOUS WEIGHT IN YACHT AND BOAT INTERIORS

ATTAINING TRADITIONAL LOOK AND FEEL IN YACHT INTERIORS AT LESS THAN ONE-THIRD THE WEIGHT OF CONVENTIONAL CONSTRUCTION...



Builders of high performance yachts grapple daily with the problem of controlling structural weight.
Reductions in structural weight mean improved performance for a given level of propulsive power. Or conversely, reduced structural weight yields reduced power requirements for a given level of performance.

Over several years and numerous projects, I've been involved in the development and refinement of engineering and construction techniques that enable a finely finished yacht interior to be built at less than 1/3 the weight of conventional construction.

Our proprietary approach involves more than simply substituting lightweight honeycomb panels for plywood under-structure.

SAVING SERIOUS WEIGHT IN YACHT AND BOAT INTERIORSWe completely "re-engineer" interior components to function as true monocoque structures,  in which the major loads are carried in the component skins.

Consequently, we not only reduce the weight of component panels, but also virtually eliminate weight-inefficient solid timber under-framing.

All of which adds up to a whopping percentage weight saving. For example, the curved front modular bath sink cabinet you see at the right looks and feels like a piece of traditional furniture, but you can lift the entire unit with one hand. (In a yacht, it is, of course, permanently fastened down.)


But our approach doesn’t stop there... we've also developed proprietary procedures for reinforcing shock-load bearing points...
For example, cabinet door hinge and latch mounting areas receive special attention.

All of which goes into not only reducing structural weight, but assuring that components are up to handling the stresses and shock-loads imposed when running hard and fast at sea

We make what looks good, work well ... in a never ending quest to capture the very best of two worlds.
SAVING SERIOUS WEIGHT IN YACHT AND BOAT INTERIORS

We've also developed a program for the seamless transfer of relevant proprietary technology, along with the benefit of our more than a decade of experience, to existing small to medium boatbuilding operations.  And we can do this without disturbing our consulting client’s production team.

We can also prototype an ultra-lightweight interior, tailor techniques and procedures specifically to a client’s needs, and work with that client’s in-house team to further train and transition the company's cabinet makers and interior joinery shipwrights. All on a very cost-effective basis, without slowing down our client’s day-to-day production schedule.


If you'd like to learn more about the proprietary procedures and techniques we've developed, and talk about your situation and needs...

SAVING SERIOUS WEIGHT IN YACHT AND BOAT INTERIORSCall or email me to arrange an appointment for a free 1/2-hour consult via telephone or Skype.

I look forward to speaking with you soon.

Fair winds and safe harbors,

SAVING SERIOUS WEIGHT IN YACHT AND BOAT INTERIORS

SAVING SERIOUS WEIGHT IN YACHT AND BOAT INTERIORS


                                                                                               

                                                                                                [Note: This 13 sq. foot burl table top weighs less than 26 pounds.]


SAVING SERIOUS WEIGHT IN YACHT AND BOAT INTERIORS

About me, Phil Friedman: With 30 some years background in the marine industry, I've worn numerous hats — as a yacht designer, boat builder, marine operations and business manager, marine industry consultant, marine marketing and communications specialist, yachting magazine writer and editor, yacht surveyor, and marine industry educator. I am also trained and experienced in interest-based negotiation and mediation. In a previous life, I taught logic and philosophy at university.


Misc. Notes:  If your in the marine industry or the small-business sector, you may want to take a look at some of my writing about small-business operations, management, and marketing:


"Small Businessman's Primer to Inbound Marketing"

"Selling Bull Chips in a Bag"

"Maximizing Throughput on Fixed Assets and Overheads"

"Small Businesses Need to Keep a Close Eye on Gross Profit"


And if you would like to discuss marketing or other issues you face in your small business, you are again invited to email or message me to arrange for a free, no-obligation 1/2-hour initial consult.

To receive notifications of my writings on a regular basis, click the [FOLLOW] button on my beBee profile. As a writer-friend of mine says, you can always change your mind later.

And, if you are interested in yachts, are allied with the yacht building industry, or operating a small business in another sector, you should consider joining my beBee Hive,

THE PORT ROYAL GROUP for Yacht Builders, Buyers and Owners

where you will find experienced industry professionals discussing a wide range of topics. The ongoing conversation is always interesting, informative, and 100% industry insider.


Text Copyright SAVING SERIOUS WEIGHT IN YACHT AND BOAT INTERIORS 2016 by Phil Friedman — All Rights Reserved

Image credits: Phil Friedman and the Port Royal Group



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Comments

Thanks Phil Friedman for your feedback. For the GMA-Georgia Manufacturing Alliance I set up the tours for plants & operations. We have had huge turnouts for Georgia Port Authority, Mitsubishi Hitachi, Outsource Logistics, & many Gulfstream Suppliers. A few weeks ago we were at the Gulfstream plant where they are building the new 650GS planes & had a 2-3 hour tour. They are building 67 of these jets this year up from last year when they produced 43. Best regards, Bill Stankiewicz, www.savannahsupplychain.com

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #2

#1
Yep, when I was running Palmer Johnson, our Savannah (Thunderbolt) operation had a an FAA-certified interior joinery fabrication facility in Pooler. And for several years we built interior components for Gulfstream on sub-contract. So, Bill, your are spot on. Thank you for reading and commenting. Cheers!

Similar material used in building components and airframe on Gulfstream 650GS jets. Great post here! regards, Bill Stankiewicz, Savannah Georgia.

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