Jerry Fletcher

1 month ago · 3 min. reading time · visibility ~100 ·

chat Contact the author

thumb_up Relevant message Comment

Consultant Marketing Journey to Success

Consultant oe

Marketing RN Ar

Journey {0 —m————

Success CREDIBILITY CREDIBILITY TO CASH CASH

J.L.LFLETCHER

4 A Different Slant

No one ever said it would be easy.

Then again, only a few folks, over time, explained what it takes in a way that was completely accessible to those ready for the advice. Some of the best known are: 

  • Ben Franklin
  • Napoleon Hill
  • Dale Carnegie
  • Claude Hopkins
  • Steven Covey

One thing marks them all: Best Seller Self-help books. 

But when you study how they came to be so admired you may find you were unaware of some things that might change your beliefs. In fact, the lessons that can be learned from these men might stretch your imagination and put a new spring in our step on your journey. Let’s take them one at a time: 

Ben Franklin

He signed all four of the documents that are the basis of formation of the United States was scientist, inventor, diplomat and the originator of a form of peer groups called a Junto. 

Ben seldom wrote under his own name. First, he wrote as Silence Dogood for his brother’s newspaper. But his best known work was Poor Richard’s Almanack. The book, filled with proverbs (many of which he invented), was published continuously for 25 years and became one of the most popular publications in colonial America, selling an average of 10,000 copies a year.

Old Ben was his own ghost writer and not afraid to present his views and ideas as inherited from the ages.

Napoleon Hill

He wrote Think and Grow Rich. To date, over 80 million copies have been sold. This may be the top selling self-help book of all time. 

It is captivating and clear. It consists of 13 principles that he derived from conversations with some of the wealthiest men of his day. It turns out that there is science to why it works which may explain its longevity.

But the thing is that Hill was not able to think, grow rich, and then write a book about it. Instead, he thought of a book, wrote it, and the riches followed.

Dale Carnegie

We know him best for his book How to Win Friends and Influence People. He said:

“You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you”

This pioneer in the field of public speaking and the psychology of the successful personality built an organization that continues to this day 

Dale was born Dale Carnagay in 1888 in Missouri. 

He changed the spelling of his name only after his first book Public Speaking and Influencing Men of Business was published

Claude Hopkins

He is a personal hero of mine, one of the great advertising pioneers. Hopkins wrote Scientific Advertising  which has sold 8 million copies (It is now available free on-line)

His basic premise was that testing all components of marketing a product was essential to overcome the risks inherent in advertising. That meant looking at product distribution, sampling, copy and graphic split-testing as well pre-empting product specifics benefits and personalities to establish a brand He was a total advertising man. 

Even though he was one of the highest paid ad men of his day he resented the fact that he had made his clients significantly wealthier than himself.

Steven Covey

Mr Covey wrote The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. At last count it had sold more than 30 million copies since it was first published in 1989. One of his lesser known quotes speaks to what I have found to be true:

“Trust is the glue of life. It's the most essential ingredient in effective communication. It's the foundational principle that holds all relationships.”

Covey presents a viewpoint that is based on his idea of where principles and values intersect. He sees values as internal and principles as external and disallows conflation. In his view, values are responsible for human behavior whereas principles control results. 

His ideas strung together in pithy statements intended to empower and inspire are seen by many as cryptic and requiring significant additional information.

My takeaways after a morning’s research:

  1. A complete model makes a self-help approach more accessible and memorable just as having a junto builds solutions capability.
  2. Being controversial or in disagreement with other self-help classics is probably a good idea particularly if your viewpoint is approachable.
  3. Personal/ individual Marketing is really what self-help is all about. Getting there means understanding what works with the audience.

I’ll be keeping these things in mind as I build out Credibility to Cash.

And so it Goes

Jerry Fletcher
Consultant
Marketing

17.

\

Jerry Fletcher is a sought-after International Speaker, a beBee ambassador, founder and CEO of Z-axis Marketing, Inc. See Jerry’s speaker demo reel.

His consulting practice, founded in 1990, is known for on and off-line Trust-based Consultant Marketing advice that builds businesses, brands and lives of joy. 

Consulting: https://www.JerryFletcher.com
Speaking: www.NetworkingNinja.com"> https://www.NetworkingNinja.com

Credibility To Cash Information Sign up for the Newslog

group_work in If you must talk work!

thumb_up Relevant message Comment
Comments

Jim Murray

1 month ago #5

Nice work, Amigo. I only ever read Napoleon Hill and Carnegie. The quotes you picked are excellent.

Jerry Fletcher

1 month ago #4

Mohammed Abdul Jawad

1 month ago #3

Great people, inspirational precepts. Perhaps, their simplicity and sensibility made them geniuses. I believe sincerity, stability coupled with practicality and patience bring in prosperity and popularity. May be everything should be well-tuned – meaning applying well when it is most wanted.

 

Thanks for mentioning about ‘Scientific Advertising’. I have just downloaded it.

Jerry Fletcher

1 month ago #2

Ken, Couldn't agree more. These days i spend my time guiding elite consultants through the maze of providing memorable service versus the demanded cascade of “Content” from staff members and their online resources.  Even those that are approaching the legendary status for their outcomes get overwhelmed by youngsters wanting to talk about service instead of providing it. When I was an ad agency CEO I had to deal with it more directly. One secret I learned was that the man or woman at the top wants a direct connection with the senior person at the service organization. That means you have to make sure the team is meeting the promises made. And so it goes.

Ken Boddie

1 month ago #1

Sometimes, Jerry, I think that young project managers in consultancies and service providers are deliberately misquoting Carnegie with, “How to loose clients and discourage return business.”  Trust and credibility can take so long to build with clients and can be quickly demolished like a house of cards with poor service. Taking care to clearly describe your scope of work at tender/proposal stage, delivering no less than (and preferably more than) promised, ensuring that the service is delivered ‘on time’ and ‘on budget’ by regular client communication and, if needed, negotiation; and ensuring that internal management, communications, and planning systems are followed throughout your project team, are all good starting points. Return business from good clients is essential for cash flow and survival and so, while young leaders must be allowed to develop and make their own mistakes, it is essential that our clients have an experienced and trustworthy person as an overviewing point of contact to avoid the ship drifting off course. 

More articles from Jerry Fletcher

View blog
1 week ago · 3 min. reading time

Consultant Marketing A More Powerful Pitch

It amazes me every time. A coach oriented approach ...

1 month ago · 3 min. reading time

Consultant Marketing Digital World Speaking

.I spoke live on Wednesday. · It was only the thir ...

1 month ago · 2 min. reading time

20 Years Ago

.I was startled by my wife screaming, “Oh my God!” ...