Casey Katchersyde

4 years ago · 1 min. reading time · visibility ~10 ·

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Stop! Maybe It's Time To Reassess Your Goals

Stop! Maybe It's Time To Reassess Your Goals


A good friend of mine is an NCAA National Champion in his sport. Actually, I am being modest. He’s a multiple-time National Champion in his sport. At the end of every season, win or lose, he takes a week or so off of training to “emotionally recover” from the excruciating practices and performances he accomplished during the season. During this time, he reflects upon the past season—what was done well and what could have been improved. He reassesses his goals and makes adjustments, and when his reflection period is over, he comes out emotionally recharged to tackle his new goals and the next season.

A few years ago, I was going through a difficult period in my life. I was emotionally and physically drained. Finally, one day, my friend said, “STOP! You need to take a week off from everything and reflect on where you’ve been and where you want to go in life.” I did what he told me and honestly, during that week, I learned more about myself than ever before. I grew up.

Recently, I have been presented with so many positive changes in my life—from graduation to moving to a new state. Another good friend, Ben Ampil, reminded me of this lesson from a few years ago. Now, I am reassessing my successes and failures of the past few years, and looking forward to where want to be 1, 5 or 10 years from now, making new goals and a simple plan for the future.

I read so many motivational posts about doing your best or the true meaning of leadership. Rarely do I see one about reflection and emotional recovery. If you find yourself in a similar situation—a new career, a big move, a great accomplishment, or maybe something not so fun to talk about—spend some time reflecting on where you’ve been. Reassess your goals in life. By doing so, you will come out emotionally recovered and ready to tackle life’s next big event.


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CityVP Manjit

CityVP Manjit

4 years ago #3

#4
This is why I do not put stock into comments but into energy, and the energy of reflection you speak of is presence. The students in my college hate my emails because their meme is that attention is precious, but I say meaning is precious and the meaning we deposit is raw material. That is the problem with education is it not, it is all about doing/having and not thinking/being - so my doing is not your being, all I have here at beBee is thinking in what is presence that got presented. What separates reflection from comments is the energy it generates and how we link this energy up will determine what it lights (hence the word enlightenment). Words like "goals" and "challenges" are also raw material but processed as an energy called reflection it can take us to a wholly different place like it did for Leo Babauta here https://zenhabits.net/no-goal/ The last thing I want to do is change others for they are responsible for that change but a comment is in the past - reflection is in the present - and the act of you reading what I am thinking out aloud here is you reading my past - for the simple reason presence is in my present. Presence is where my energy meets my consciousness where I am fully alive, and so is reflection a foundation like a house or is it an energy that travels through a house that makes a house a home and shifts making a living into making a life?

Casey Katchersyde

Casey Katchersyde

4 years ago #2

Such wonderful comments Jerry Fletcher, and Michael O'Neil! Thank You! I'm very happy to hear how your experiences with this topic has helped you realize new goals and take on new challenges. As I am constantly learning, I am excited to practice new life experiences and being able to reflect back is a foundation to being able to move forward.

CityVP Manjit

CityVP Manjit

4 years ago #1

When I was taking selfies in the early 80's, it looked odd that someone at that time would point a camera at themselves and take a picture, so when my kids discovered an old album of selfies, they screamed "Hey! Papa used to take selfies!!!". The same goes with reflective practice. People are not familiar or largely do not engage in reflection, yet both of us do and therefore we represent the early majority of this particular way of thinking. Of course reflection cannot be compared to selfies. Reflection is a higher order faculty, whereas selfies is a lower order indulgence. The irony is that in recent decades I tend to limit being in photographs because reflective practice helps see through things and become conscious of what is image and what is presence. Nor do I take pictures on my travels to capture moments to add them to the 10,000 other captured moments because it is easy to engage visual collection - but it is more meaningful for me to be present and enjoy the blessings of a mind that is more relaxed and free - and ironically in such a mind, there is greater room to learn to see, which sits at the basis of what we can imagine and in this way reflection is a complimentary intelligence to vision and this "learning to see".

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