Phil Friedman

4 years ago · 1 min. reading time · visibility 0 ·

chat Contact the author

thumb_up Relevant message Comment

Invitations Such As This to Commit Academic Fraud Are ...

Invitations Such As This to Commit Academic Fraud Are ...

NOT ONLY ETHICALLY REPREHENSIBLE BUT GENERALLY PRAGMATICALLY STUPID ...


Notice that the "author" of this offer to help you cheat on school writing assignments makes more than eight substantive grammatical and style errors in the first run-on sentence of this introduction to his or her advertisement on behalf of premeditated cheating.

He or she then goes to make even more errors in the balance of the text.

BeBee should be embarrassed to carry this, but even more that its content-bot gave the article-cum-advertisement a "relevant".

Both students and non-students in need of writing help should seek out legitimate providers of writing improvement services. And they should avoid those who offer to help them commit academic and intellectual fraud.  -- Phil Friedman 


Before writing comes thinking (The optional-to-read pitch)

As a professional writer, editor, university educator, and speaker, with more than 1,000 print and digital publications, I've recently launched an online program for enhancing your expository writing: learn2engage — With Confidence. My mission is to help writers and would-be writers improve their thought and writing, master the logic of discussion, and strengthen their ability to deal with disagreement. We help you improve your writing in ways that will benefit you throughout your academic career and future professional life.



For more information, click on the image immediately above. Or to schedule an appointment for a free 1/2-hour consult or to sit in on one of our online group sessions, email: info@learn2engage.org. I look forward to speaking with you soon. 



#WRITING #WRITINGIMPROVEMENT #BETTERWRITING #EDUCATION #WRITEBETTER

thumb_up Relevant message Comment
Comments
Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

3 years ago #31

#33
I agree that writing non-bylined material for a brand or firm is NOT ghostwriting. But not because of who the user is, rather because there usn’t a byline attached. For the same reason, no ethical issues are involved. Cheers!

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

3 years ago #30

#33
I agree that writing non-bylines material for a brand or firm is NOT ghostwriting. But not because of who the user is, rather because there usn’t a byline attached. For the same reason, no ethical issues are involved. Cheers!

Alexa Steele

Alexa Steele

3 years ago #29

#32
This might go without saying, but there is also a difference between writing content for a brand and writing on behalf of an individual. When I write content for a brand I don't consider it ghostwriting, even if I don't get the byline. Of course, a nice "about the author" blurb with a link back to my website is always nice, but not required under a writing-for-hire scenario.

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

3 years ago #28

#31
Very good point, Alexa Steele. There is a spectrum of ghostwriting which runs from re-write/editing (polishing up the client's original work and ideas) to writing a piece from start to finish, including developing the original idea(s). The latter is, as you say, just as questionable ethically as writing academic papers to be submitted under someone else's name. I personally have always been able to dissuade a potential client from taking the latter path by pointing out the risk of exposure if someone smart should simply ask a couple of well-framed questions about the work. And I usually suggest writing the piece under my own byline, specifically for their use with a brief introduction by them to the white paper or other piece. That way, they get to "content" mileage out of the piece but avoid misrepresenting it as their original work. Cheers!

Alexa Steele

Alexa Steele

3 years ago #27

#29
I agree with Paul \. Ghostwriting is about helping someone (usually a professional) put his or her own ideas into presentable pros. Of course, there are plenty of ghostwritten works out there to which the named author contributed zero original thought. But I would question those works legitimacy just as much as you are with the academic papers.

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

3 years ago #26

#29
Good points, Paul \. The point is that selling an academic paper to a student with the intent for that student to submit it for credit as his or her own work is NOT ghostwriting. It is soliciting and participating in academic fraud. Ghostwriting is, as you point out, writing for hire. I would add that it has to do with helping someone communicate his or her ideas to an audience -- which might be customers or colleagues or target markets. It might even be for the purpose of creating a white paper or a book that is sold for profit. None of which is fraudulent because the work itself has more or less value and stands on its own. This is not the case for an academic paper which is submitted in satisfaction of an assignment or requirement in connection with the student (the buyer) receiving certification that he or she has completed a given course of study satisfactorily. That IS fraudulent. In some cases, you may feel it doesn't matter. But what would you think if the professional engineer who designed the high bridge you drive across every day had cheated by having someone else do most of his or her work in the course of getting a degree and being certified? Or the surgeon who is going to take out your appendix next week? Or -- perhaps this will make more sense -- the chef who is nominally trained and given a certificate in safe food handling? How would you feel about people in Quebec hiring other people to take their driver's license tests for them? Oh, wait, that might not be a fair question about Montreal drivers. :-)

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

3 years ago #25

So, guys, I am surprised that up to this point nobody out there has raised the question of how this differs from "legitimate" ghostwriting -- if it does. What say you? Paul \ and others?

Randall Burns

Randall Burns

3 years ago #24

#26
Reminds me of the, "Derek Zoolander School For Kids That Can't Read Good And Want To Do Other Things Good Too "

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

3 years ago #23

#24
Perhaps, Randall Burns, the target market is non-English students seeking degrees at English-speaking schools. So the idea is not to write papers in perfect English. Aw, the fact is that such services exist only because of academic laziness in reading and evaluating work submitted by students. What would happen if someone offered to take medical exams for others? Probably bury a lot of the mistakes.

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

3 years ago #22

#21
Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic, academics who provide writing services would have to be already “defrocked” or risk being fired for academic/ethics violation. For this kind of activity strikes at the heart of academic principle. Cheers!

Randall Burns

Randall Burns

3 years ago #21

LMAO Phil Friedman, too funny in that anyone needing these "services" will fall for it bypassing the clear lack of a grasp of the English language presented in this "buzz/ad" while I immediately saw the glaring mistakes right off the bat, (seriously thought it was a joke when I first saw it)

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

4 years ago #20

#20
I read about those folks you've mentioned Praveen. There are also many controversies about academics who write essays for sale. It's difficult to fully see the effects of using a writing assignment service in the world of higher education.

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #19

#17
I agree, Wayne Yoshida, in the main. However, I believe this is worse than simply buying a supposed credential from a diploma mill. For with the mill, the lack of legitimate accreditation is easily obvious. While a fraudulent paper or thesis, might (just might) result in getting a degree from a legitimate institution. Cheers!

Milos Djukic

Milos Djukic

4 years ago #18

#6
Thank you Javier \ud83d\udc1d beBee.

Wayne Yoshida

Wayne Yoshida

4 years ago #17

Thanks for catching this, Phil Friedman for removing it. Those "services" exist for a long time. Unfortunately, all it teaches is a way to cheat or to buy one's credentials. It is important to un-cover and remove such practices, since this is what diminishes the value of any certification, endorsement or diploma.

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #16

#13
Yep, Jerry Fletcher, what I try to explain to people seeking to improve their writing is that it is simply the expression of their ideas. So the first step is to strengthen your thinking because strong ideas expressed in an average way will always win out over weak ideas clothed in the finest of language. Cheers!

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #15

#11
Yes, Neil, especially when you consider that his natural abilities ran along the lines of being a Pastry Chef -- for clearly he was able to generate just desserts. :-)

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #14

#10
True, Franci\ud83d\udc1dEugenia Hoffman, beBee Brand Ambassador, but people with some money, few barins, and even less integrity sometimes choose to buy their way out or through or over obstacles.

Jerry Fletcher

Jerry Fletcher

4 years ago #13

Phil, NIce Catch. I once asked a friend that consults and trains on business writing what she does. She said, "I teach people how to think."

Jerry Fletcher

Jerry Fletcher

4 years ago #12

Phil, Good catch. I once asked a writer friend who teaches business writing in the corporate world . Her ans were was, "I teach people to think."

Neil Smith

Neil Smith

4 years ago #11

Earlier this year a student in England tried to sue an essay mill because the quality of the essay he had paid for was not as advertised. When the university became aware of the case he was expelled from the course and to rub salt into his wounds his case was dismissed along with some harsh words from the judge. I couldn't help wonder if he had made a mistake in choosing to study law.

Franci 🐝Eugenia Hoffman, beBee Brand Ambassador

IMHO, this is taking the easy way out and not quality learning. It may be a short-term fix for some but not quality learning for the long term. Plus, why fill a good mind with unproven and useless information.

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #9

#6
Good!

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #8

#7
Social media has fostered the attitude that one can simply "create" oneself. Which to many means self-ascribing titles, expertise, even degrees. I believe that it is therefore SM's responsibility to clean up the mess it's made. As you point out, Pascal, there comes a time when the self-ascribed expert has to deliver "the goods". And that's often the end of that. For you can live in a fantasy just until you crash into the wall of reality. Cheers!

Pascal Derrien

Pascal Derrien

4 years ago #7

I went back to school three years ago to complete a part time diploma in journalism applied coms & PR it was intense as squeezing 6 hours of lecture /week + work on top of a 3 full day exams but it would have never occurred to me to do this anyway on exam day it would be and me only that would be tested.....

Javier 🐝 CR

Javier 🐝 CR

4 years ago #6

Removed!

Milos Djukic

Milos Djukic

4 years ago #5

#4
I agree, Phil Friedman. Degrees and diplomas within reputable academic institutions worldwide still have meaning and they are of the utmost importance, despite some current and wrong trends that have intentions directed towards neglecting of the importance of education and academic institutions. Education is what gives people hope. It is the only treasure that can bring progress. Teaching is the most impressive way to help people.

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #4

#3
I agree, Milos Djukic. The difference is that in schools and academic institutions, the student (writer) is being evaluated and certified as having completed a given course of study satisfactorily. If degrees or diplomas are to have any meaning at all, they have to represent the completion of the program by the student him- or herself. Cheers!

Milos Djukic

Milos Djukic

4 years ago #3

#2
I couldn't agree more Phil Friedman, my friend. For example my English is not perfect, but I'm a persistent learner :) Writing of articles for others in social media (ghostwriting) is one activity, while the correction of them (proofreading) is something completely different. In schools and academic institutions ghostwriting of essays, technical papers, thesis, and scientific papers is not allowed.

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #2

#1
Thank you for sharing this buzz, Milos Djukic. As you are well aware, the right way to deal with writing assignments in school is to learn to write better. For that will help you right on through life and career. Cheers, my friend!

Milos Djukic

Milos Djukic

4 years ago #1

Thanks Phil Friedman! Engaging in this type of unacceptable practices is illegal and unethical. Period.

More articles from Phil Friedman

View blog
2 years ago · 1 min. reading time
Phil Friedman

It’s Good To Be Back Testing and Reviewing Yachts for Major Magazines

GETTING OUT ON THE WATER IN YACHTS LIKE THE RIVIER ...

2 years ago · 7 min. reading time
Phil Friedman

The New State Of The Union: Is the Cup Half-Empty or Half-Full?

WILL KICKING BUTT IN THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTAT ...

3 years ago · 7 min. reading time
Phil Friedman

Double Trouble Returns

THE DYNAMIC DUO OF DUMPING-ON-EVERYTHING IS BACK … ...