Phil Friedman

5 years ago · 8 min. reading time · visibility ~10 ·

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About Writing About Writing

About Writing About Writing


WHEREIN THE AUTHOR LOOKS AT THE GROWING WRITER'S COMMUNITY ON BEBEE AND ASKS WHY SO MANY SEEM COMPELLED TO TELL OTHERS HOW TO WRITE...


Preface:  Between the time I started writing this post and the time I finished it,  Alexa Steele  published  "How to be a better writer by ignoring writing advice". And while I did not use her post for "inspiration", I am exceedingly sympathetic to her general thesis and would feel remiss not to refer you to it here. Well done, Alexa.


There is little doubt that a community of writers is burgeoning on beBee.  Not just a group of people who write and publish on social media, but a genuine community interested in interacting and honing their craft.

The skill levels of members of the beBee writer's community range from neophyte to expert, from raw wannabees to a sprinkling of pros. Journalists, essayists, bloggers, poets, and novelists. Expository and creative. The entire enchilada.

Which is good for beBee and the rest of us.  For it brings to the platform a broad range of topics about which to read and discuss, not to mention a rich diversity of genres and styles to keep things interesting and stimulate thought.



That said, I've noticed lately that quite a few of those who write on beBee appear compelled to write about writing. That is, to tell, demonstrate for, or instruct others in how to write.

I for one am not sure what to make of this marked propensity. For historically, writers spend most of their time writing and not coaching others on how to write.

Indeed, in my experience, even writers and novelists whom I've known over the years and who, for whatever reasons, accepted short-term appointments at colleges or universities as authors-in-residence,  were not overly comfortable with coaching others in how to write.

For the most part, I personally avoid telling others how to write because I believe that each of us must find his or her own style and voice. Plus, I've never been that sure about what qualifies one to call him- or herself a "writer". Not to mention that it has always struck me as bordering on arrogant to offer such unsolicited advice.

I've even gone so far as to publish a piece titled Why I am NOT a Writer.

Yet, here we are with almost everybody who writes on social media in general, and on beBee in particular, telling others how to write ― or at least how to write better.

Including not only those with substantial bodies of published work, but also many neophyte authors who may have only two or three self-published pieces under their respective belts.

Nevertheless, I recognize my personal view is, in this case, purely gut-based. I also recognize that there are people from whom the rest of us can learn something about perfecting our chosen craft.

For example, there is my friend, Jim Murray, whom I consider an op/ed blogger extraordinaire, often says that he is not telling others how to write, but is only explaining how he writes. Of course, that's really a dodge. Because, in fact, Jim regularly provides neophyte writers with tips on how to write better and especially how to draw response and engagement from readers.



Then, there is Kevin Pashuk, essayist and Prairie-Culture philosopher, who admonishes us regularly not to write in order to become writers but in order to say something. As he puts it, to "... write good." Kevin and I often disagree on issues or approaches to issues, but ―  and this is the most important point ―  we share an unshakeable underlying mutual commitment to the importance and value of free and open discussion.



Also, Don Kerr, who recommends "mindfullness" in writing, thinking, and living. Don is an authentic Sensitive, dressed in the clothing of a hard-boiled marketing and advertising writer, whose copy often stands as a paradigm for other writers and would-be writers to study, as they seek to refine their own skills and develop their own styles and voices.



Admittedly, these three experienced, first-rate writers are my buds and cohorts in the Beezers hive and the Four Strong Winds series. So naturally, my thoughts go to them first when I consider the growing group of writers on beBee.



However, there are a number of additional writers on beBee these days who are well worth reading, and whose work is well worth studying for style and voice, including but not limited to:


Joel Anderson --- A no-nonsense, say-it-like-it-is kind of writer, who enhances the conversation with every hard-edged contribution.


Andrew Books --- Andy is a dyed-in-the-wool Wisconsin "cheese head" with an attractive Midwestern philosophy and way of speaking ... which belies his wicked sense of humor and appreciation for Mel Brooks and Groucho Marx. He's also a top-flite expository writer.


Nicole Charenet --- Has an almost impish sense of humor, if its possible to mix that with a tough literary right cross. Says it like it is, whether its politically correct or not.




Robert Cormack
--- Published (published is important) novelist and a real pro, edgy in conversation, but always with flashes of insight.



Paul Croubalian --- Paul writes on a variety of social media topics and has given advice on how to write better, particularly how to write in a simpler and more understandable way.



Milos Djukic --- Milos is one of my oldest online writer-friends, and someone with whom I often disagree. But he has made a outstanding contribution to the concept of social media writing, and is a champion of of free and open expression.



Pascal Derrien --- Pascal refuses to style himself as a "writer", but in fact, he is a marvelously talented storyteller whose work resonates, nay reverberates with authenticity and grit.




Graham Edwards
--- Graham has a renaissance outlook and displays serious insight into avariety of questions and topics, from the point of view of a self-admitted "contrarian".



Donna-Luisa Eversley
--- A Caribbean lilt threads its beauty through both her spoken and written voices. Positive, uplifting optimism, but underneath a tough willingness to speak out against the dark side.



David Grinberg --- A public relations writing pro, always questioning and fostering open discussion.



Gerald Hecht --- Whose writing and demeanor epitomizes that of the "mad scientist", but who demonstrates brilliant flashes of insight and a deep and abiding commitment to science, intellectual honesty and academic responsibility.




Phillip Hubbell
--- Justifiably or not, Phillip's writing raises inn my mind images of William Buckley's essays, polished, educated, and reminiscent of a northeastern patrician background.


Melissa Hughes --- Melissa brings insight, common sense, and positivity to the discussion, without the cloying sweetness of the unreflective yea-sayers.




Jesse Kaellis --- (deceased) Jesse and I traded verbal punches at times (big surprise), but Jesse was a skillful and gritty storyteller. Creative writing that resonates. He is missed.



Randy Keho --- Acerbic wit, professional writing background, Randy's style and voice cut right through the piles of bull chips generally found on social media.



Susan Rooks --- Who, like Buster Brown, lives in a shoe, whilst being, due to her wit and good humor, the only tolerable teacher of grammar and spelling I have ever known.



Gert Scholtz --- Brings wit and intelligence to subjects of day-to-day concern, including sports.




Paul Walters --- Novelist, travel writer, raconteur. Always brings a spark of life to the publishing platform, not to mention a really winning smile.



John White
--- Inc.com columnist and social media marketing maven, John's writing is the epitome of clarity. He's done more to help promote other writers than just about anyone else I know on social media.




The roughly "dirty double-dozen"  word-slingers mentioned in this piece are some of my favorite writers on beBee. Because they all exude what I consider to be a key quality in writing:  authenticity.

Yep, I know that's generally an amorphous concept, overused and more often a cliche than otherwise. However, in this context, I use the term as shorthand for writing about things that one knows or has experienced, or writing creatively in a voice that resonates with believability.

Such is in distinct contrast to so much of what is published on social media. You know, the articles on leadership by those who have never led even a Brownie troop. The posts on becoming a successful entrepreneur by those who have just recently embarked on the entrepreneurial journey, having found themselves unemployed. And yes, the blogs on how to be a successful writer by those who have yet to publish their third article.



My purpose in compiling the above list is not only to promote the writers involved but to provide those interested in improving their own writing with a practical way to do so. Which, I suggest, is to read some of the first-rate practitioners of the craft who have assembled in the writer's community on beBee.

My purpose is also to demonstrate --- or perhaps more accurately, to remonstrate once again on --- my pet peeve about too may people on social media believing that the conversation should always be about telling others how great they are and what a great post they've just published.

And to do so by providing you with examples of those who take the opposite approach. In particular, writers who publish interesting, often hard-edged content. And who engage in open, honest discussion.

My best to all of these writers, and to the writer's community that is growing by leaps and bounds here on beBee.



Fair winds and safe harbors  ---  Phil Friedman


Afterword:  Please do not write to upbraid me for being selective or discriminatory. This is my personal list and is not represented to be objective or exhaustive. No doubt, there are many other writers on beBee deserving of recognition or who one would do well to read and emulate. If you feel strongly about bringing a  particular writer to the attention of other writers on beBee or the platform's readership, you are welcome to mention someone (with a link to their work) in the comments section for this post. You are also welcome to comment on the post, whether you agree or disagree with the statements it contains. For conversation is what it's all about. --- PLF

 

Author's Notes: If you found this post interesting and worthwhile, and would like to receive notifications of my writings on a regular basis, click the [FOLLOW] button on my beBee profile. Better yet, elect there to follow my blog by email. As a writer-friend of mine says, you can always change your mind later.

Should you be curious about some of my other writings, you're invited to take a look at the following from my Chicago Stories series:

"Two Pizzas and a Shovel"

"Wake Up Little Susie"

"Vending Machines Are People Too"


As well, feel free to "like" and "share" this post and my other articles — whether on beBee, LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, or Google+, provided only that you credit me properly as the author, and include a live link to my original post.


About me, Phil FriedmanWith 30 some years background in the marine industry, I've worn numerous hats — as a yacht designer, boat builder, marine operations and business manager, marine industry consultant, marine marketing and communications specialist, yachting magazine writer and editor, yacht surveyor, and marine industry educator. I am also trained and experienced in interest-based negotiation and mediation.

In a previous life, I was formally trained as an academic philosopher and taught logic and philosophy at university.




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Comments

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #78

#109
Thank you, Debsish, for saying so. I greatly appreciate your saying so, especially now after being the target of a backstage campaign to paint me as someone who is arrogantly negative and unkind. My best to you.

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #77

#107
Debasish, thank you for reading and commenting. I am not so sure that beBee is fundamentally different from other social media in the way you suggest. I agree that because it is more international, the mix of writers whose first languages are other than English is higher; and we need to b careful not to mistake less than optimal language skills in English for lack of acumen in other areas. However, I do not believe that you have ever seen me personally making that mistake. And none of what I've said in this post in any way involves that type of criticism. Cheers!

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #76

#104
Jesse, I appreciate your saying so, but it really isn't my place to "forgive" anything, nor was there anything to forgive. You and I had some private words, and like adults, we've both reconsidered chosen to move on. I value your friendship as a fellow writer, whom I respect highly. Be well. Cheers!

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #75

#101
Gerry, "Friedman" is a common name among U.S. Jews because it was easy to pronounce and spell, and so was a favorite among Ellis Island immigration officials -- who "assigned" it when they could not pronounce or spell a surname of an immigrant from Eastern Europe. I am sure that my paternal grandfather originall had a different Romanian surname. Cheers!

Milos Djukic

5 years ago #74

#99
I will, thank you Gerald Hecht!

Milos Djukic

5 years ago #73

#93
Dear Gerald Hecht. Your writing style is very special and worthy. Best, Fractal bird

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #72

#91
Praveen, thank you for reading and commenting with such care. I agree that there is a place for everyone on beBee. And that, when it comes to writing, there is a myriad of motivations and many different levels of competency. But I also believe that those who give tips for writing better (which I don't generally do) do not mean to restrict anyone from writing and publishing on beBee. I believe they are genuinely trying to be helpful. And all I am saying is that if one wants to learn to write better, the best way to do so is to read those writers who are very good at it. Cheers!

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #71

#88
#89 Thank you, Irene and Tony, for reading and commenting. I am sure there are other writers which other readers would add to the list --- or to their lists --- but the real point is, as I am sure you see, that there is a very strong community of writers growing here on beBee. Cheers!

Randy Keho

5 years ago #70

#84
Stop trying to rationalize the fact that your writing has no conceivable format whatsoever. What would alien beings think of us if they snatched you as a sample of our abilities to communicate? lol

Stellar group, Phil. Sharing.

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #68

#80
Mark, when I say #LETTHEAUDIENCEDECIDE, I'm not talking about media (digital or otherwise) that are editorially controlled. What I'm talking about are self-publishing venues such as LinkedIn and beBee. And what letting the audience decide means in such cases is that distribution should be on the basis of a level playing field, and that readers should be able to decide, without algorithmic or other interference, for themselves which authors they are going to read and follow.Thanks for reading and commenting.

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #67

#81
Thank you, John. Cheers!

John White, MBA

5 years ago #66

Phil Friedman: You nailed it with this one and far surpassed the minimum engagement requirements (20 relevants and 5 reader comments) to be eligible to be promoted via beBee's social media. So, we have shared this one around including Facebook, Google+, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Well done...

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #65

#78
Robert, in my gut, I agree. For example, I sometimes would like to see editorial control on social media. But then this lettle voice says, "Who would decide? And would you still feel that way if you thought you wouldn't make the cut?" Maybe just better to let the market decide. Cheers!

Robert Cormack

5 years ago #64

You're absolutely right, Phil, but we've reached the point of saturation. Two million titles a year isn't the "audience deciding," it's a flood of anything printable. I'm only published because my agent couldn't stand seeing so many good writers being rejected by the Big Five. There must be a better way to open the market with some sort of editorial restriction.#77

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #63

#75
Robert, I agree that self-publishing (like vanity publishing) in some senses removes the element of peer editorial review and authentication. But it could be argued that "traditional" publishing circles are rife with cliques and power brokers and in no way a true meritocracy anyway. Moreover, that the only level playing field is the population of readers. And that we should #LETTHEAUDIENCEDECIDE. In which case, it is immaterial how a book gets before the public. Maybe. Thank you for joining the conversation. Cheers!

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #62

#74
Thank you, Debasish, for reading and commenting.

Robert Cormack

5 years ago #61

Thanks for the plug @Phil Friedman and the words of wisdom. I find there's a lot of "asking" here on beBee, mostly by would-be writers wanting to know the ins and outs of the business. The only "in" is to simply write what others haven't written. Obviously, this is a huge task, but being published means you're past the "copying" stage. Someone hears your "voice" and are willing to put money and time behind it. If you're getting rejected, there's a reason. It isn't that you're not "understood" it's that you're not there yet. To say "Fuck it, I'll publish myself" sounds brave, but the bravest souls are those who fight harder, criticize themselves more and face the criticism of others. If you just want a book out there, then you're not a writer, you're a self-promoter. And you'll soon notice you're "out" a lot quicker than dedicated writers. Not that there's anything wrong with self-promoters. I think they're a lot of fun. They're just not writers. I call them "poets of promotion" and some of them are very good.

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #60

#72
Gerald, it is always my pleasure... as well as my honor. Keep the faith. And cheers!

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #59

#69
Thank you, Gert, for the exceptionally kind words. And thank you for supporting and being part of the community of writers on beBee. I am not sure that I am entitled to speak for that community... but then again, I'm not sure anyone else is either. So, there it is. Cheers!

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #58

#67
Thank you, Donna-Luisa, for reading and commenting, and for writing and being an integral part of the community of writers on beBee. Cheers!

Gert Scholtz

5 years ago #57

Phil Friedman I have read this post a few times trying to analyse what makes your writing so compelling. To me it is your extreme eloquence coupled with an easy natural flow. A rare combination. On your every post you leave me with much to think about and consider. So may I say - while you are not writing about how to write, you sure are teaching me about writing! Thank you Phil.

don kerr

5 years ago #56

There ya go!#64

Milos Djukic

5 years ago #55

#64
Kudos Randy Keho, you're the man :) What the Hell is that? It seems to me that I was a bad student. So how does one become enlightened? Never mind. My next destination after Dallas in 2015 - Chicago. Is there any conference?

Randy Keho

5 years ago #54

#61
Okay. You asked for it, but I refuse to held responsible for any repercussions. There are ladies in the audience. I'll tease you with the term. You'll have to decipher its meaning on your own. I fondly referred to my office manager as a "Whisker Biscuit." Even though she's from a snooty suburbs, she found it amusing.Don Kerr

Milos Djukic

5 years ago #53

#60
No problem Randy Keho, because I certainly will not understand :) I am beginner in English.

Milos Djukic

5 years ago #52

#58
Yes please Randy Keho.

don kerr

5 years ago #51

#60
That sounds curiously like a challenge I could take up.

Randy Keho

5 years ago #50

#58
The words are too offensive for even me to repeat, unless you piss me off. Don Kerr

Milos Djukic

5 years ago #49

#57
Randy Keho, I guess I can accept this, maybe in a private conversation. Until then, I will remain an egghead :-)

don kerr

5 years ago #48

#57
So share. Don't tease. Damn it Randy Keho

Randy Keho

5 years ago #47

#54
They've left out some of my favorites, which are much more colorful and ungentlemanly. Milos Djukic

Graham🐝 Edwards

5 years ago #46

#40
I have to say I agree with you Phil Friedman... which just sorta bugs me as a contrarian and all... lol Cheers to the contrarians! : )

Milos Djukic

5 years ago #45

#48
Phil Friedman, Now I'm your diligent student... Let's start from the beginning -- first you egghead Milos :-)... "Top 40 Chicago Words—Our Contributions to the English Language" by Graham Meyer at www.chicagomag.com http://www.chicagomag.com/Chicago-Magazine/July-2010/Top-40-Chicago-Words-Our-Contributions-to-the-English-Language/

Milos Djukic

5 years ago #44

#51
Neither did I Pascal Derrien :) Thanks!

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #43

#50
David, thank you for the kind words. Cheers!

Pascal Derrien

5 years ago #42

#49
no harm done Milos Djukic I don't master any language properly at this stage :-)

David B. Grinberg

5 years ago #41

Thanks for the "shout out" Phil. There's no doubt YOU would likewise be on any list of mine which highlighted top bloggers and thought leaders. I've shared this buzz on three hives: 'Writers" and "Bloggers" and "Writers & Bloggers on beBee." Buzz onward and upward, my friend!

Milos Djukic

5 years ago #40

#48
Thanks for the info Phil Friedman.

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #39

#37
Thank you, Milos for reading and commenting. Actually, I have to disagree about you being the only writer listed whose mother tongue is not English. One might not realize it, but Pascal falls into that category, as well. As does Randy Keho, who speak Chicagoese. Cheers!

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #38

#39
Ah, Kevin, so you really like Irish ale? Me too.

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #37

#33
Yes, that may be so, Alexa. But I suspect that you agree with me that those who write do, and many who write about writing can't. Or am I thinking of a saying about doing versus teaching? Well, no matter, since a stitch in time, breaks par on the back nine. Or something like that. Cheers! :-)

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #36

#30
Gert, thank you for reading and commenting. Witty is sometimes over-rated ... as is brevity. https://www.bebee.com/producer/@friedman-phil/brevity-is-over-rated Cheers!

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #35

#28
Aaron, for reading and for your gracious comment. I am pleased to see that a genuine community of writers is growing here on beBee. Thank you for your kind support, and for joining the comments. As someone famous once said, the Devil is in the comments... or some such bull chip of Wisdom. Cheers!

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #34

#27
Thank you< Laurent, for reading and commenting. I know you read a lot, and so respect, and am gratified by your judgment. Best. Phil.

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #33

#26
Phillip (two-Ls), it's your writing style ... plus the glasses and your erudite manner. Not that it is a bad thing. William Buckley was among my favorite expository writers, even though politically we were worlds apart. That is the thing about literate conversation; it's fun even when the parties disagree. Best reegards. Philip (one-L). Cheers!

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #32

#24
Andy, to be accurate, I didn't call you wicked. I said you had a wicked sense of humor, like that Cheese Wedge hat you wear to Packers games. :-)

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #31

#23
Graham, you and I share a kind of contrariness, wouldn't you say? Or not, depending on how much of a contrarian you really are. I always feel it is better to be a Devil's advocate than an advocate for Insipidipity. Cheers! :-)

Kevin Pashuk

5 years ago #30

#38
MOLSON????? We only brew that to export.... I prefer my beer BEFORE it goes through the horse... I'll buy you a real beer when you get here.

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #29

#20
Kevin, I agree that there are other writers who could and should be added to the list or put on another list. But that is you job or someone else's. I will relax and quaff my Molson whilst you work, next time I am in Toronto. Cheers!

Milos Djukic

5 years ago #28

Phil Friedman, It is a fact that I am the only member of beBee that is listed in this post whose mother tongue is not English, just that alone makes me feel honored above all things. Even though we have our |"disagreements", our relationship is based on respect on both side. There are several different stages of a friendship and lasting friendships demand greater personal commitment, just as in this case. That is not easy in the case of social media. This friendship will not be damaged, even if we disagree on several things. Thank you for the kind words Mr No-Muzak.

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #27

#16
Nicole, like you I tend not to write about how to write. Mostly because I don't believe there are any rules. Oh sure, you might be able to formulate some basic rules for writing an appliance instruction manual or similar. But if one really enjoys reading good writing, you have to believe that strict rules produce only cookie-cutter prose ... or fiction. And what fun is that to read? Cheers!

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #26

#15
Thank you, Mark, for taking the time to say so. Cheers!

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #25

#13
Joel, the gratitude is on my side for your contributions to the community of writers on beBee. Cheers!

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #24

#12
Pascal, like the rest of us, I think you seriously underestimate your own writing. Which is why I compiled this list. It is not exhaustive, by any means, so I am hoping that others will add to the list in this comments thread. I have to say that, personally, I believe the publishing platform to be at the core of potential beBee growth going forward. And it is by means of the Producer content that beBee will distinguish itself from the other social media platforms. Cheers!

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #23

#17
Thank you, Melissa, for the kind words. And for joining and contributing, as you do, to the conversation within the beBee writer's community. Cheers!

Gert Scholtz

5 years ago #22

Phil Friedman A sincere thanks for the mention Phil! I was trying to think of a witty, smart reply - but I have none! I learn every day from posts, comments and conversations from all the excellent writers on beBee. Someday, there will be a "braai" in South Africa with Phil and other story tellers sitting around the fire, regaling each other till late into the night with their tales and anecdotes....

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #21

#21
Well, Randy, I did have to pull out a copy of webster's to check "aforementioned" , but I survived, thanks.

Laurent Boscherini

5 years ago #20

Thank you Phil Friedman for sharing your uplifting and educational approach about the first BeBee 's blooming season, so well expressed by so many talented thinkers, doers, givers ... All are humble and consistent people, and driven by its examplarity of authenticity to be themselves. Congratulations to remind us that key point and issue.

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #19

#11
Yea, Jim, I know. But I also know --- or rather, have learned from you --- that one often needs to poke people to encourage them to respond. :-)

Graham🐝 Edwards

5 years ago #18

I am truly humbled Phil Friedman and really appreciate the shoutout! Thanks to everyone on the list because they are so much fun to read! And that of course includes you Phil.

don kerr

5 years ago #17

#21
Ah Randy Keho. Clearly, you came home from the Ice Dogs game and started rummaging about in your Roget's.

Randy Keho

5 years ago #16

Thanks for including my mentor, Alfred E. Neuman. Phil Friedman Without him, I'd have never moved on from picture books. As Chung King once said, "One picture worth a thousand bull chips." But, add a few bubble quotes and you've got a compelling story. Yes. Better reading leads to better writing. As a result, I'm better for reading the aforementioned writers (I know "aforementioned" is a big word, but I thought you could handle it.)

Kevin Pashuk

5 years ago #15

We may disagree on some thing Phil, but damn you, you've stolen another idea! I was doing the 'pre-writing mumbling to myself' about my next post and this fine article shows up with many of my musings... Since we haven't discussed this, it was almost as if you had mind melded... Wait! That would be mystical :)... We do know you didn't read my mind, but as you said, we share some foundational level passions around authentic dialog. You have set out a list of fine writers here, and as you mentioned, it's your list, and there are many other fine writers on beBee that each of us have in their network. It's our job as community members to promote other's work, and Phil has set up a good precedent here. For this fine work, I'll actually buy you a (Canadian) beer, but you have to come to Canada to get it.

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #14

#14
with Trump in the White House, Paul, non-devaluable gold coins would be best. Send via FedEx. Thanks. :-)

Paul Walters

5 years ago #13

Phil Friedman To say I am flattered would be an understatement!!! However onto matters practical...to whom do I make the cheque out to, or would you prefer cash ?

Joel Anderson

5 years ago #12

What a great post. Humbled that you included me. Appreciate all that you do. Keep making a difference.

Pascal Derrien

5 years ago #11

#10
thanks Phil Friedman I hope it is the shopping list you are talking about :-) because I know great writers who should be in it way before me... I actually do a lot editing online too not perfect my mind functions like that I would be a nightmare for an editor some words only show up when it is too late sometimes.... so I change them :-) PS: For the shopping list just squeezed me between the Slim Line Tonic and the organic granola I will feel confortable there

Jim Murray

5 years ago #10

Phil Friedman I'm flattered, although I remain in mild disagreement in terms of your statement re: me. I am on the record, several times, as pointing out that writing is only something that can be self-taught. The elements of style and the need for authenticity and finding one's true voice, however, are the things that I tend to promote. But thanks for the mention. Being a communications guy, I will post this everywhere. Great piece, and when you think about it the way you have presented it, you can see that beBee is very much the 'haven for writers' you describe.

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #9

#2
Pascal, one of the nice features of digital publishing is that a writer can correct his or her mistakes and oversights at the touch of a few keys. Which means that I can (and am) adding your name to my list of read-worthy writers. As I had intended it to be there in the first place. I know you do not style yourself a writer, but you are a natural storyteller, whose tales resonate, nay reverberate with authenticity. And your support for the writer's community is palpable --- without being in the least cloying. Cheers!

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #8

Randy Keho, you are mentioned in this post.

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #7

Donna-Luisa Eversley, you are mentioned in this post.

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #6

Joel Anderson, you are mentioned in this post.

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #5

Jim Murray, you are mentioned in this post.

don kerr

5 years ago #4

Good stuff Phil Friedman sharing and declaring your inclusion on writers worry reading.

Javier 🐝 CR

5 years ago #3

great names here ! thanks !

Pascal Derrien

5 years ago #2

Some great pointers and great names with greata articles even if I say so myself :-)

Phil Friedman

5 years ago #1

Alexa Steele, you are mentioned in this post. Cheers!

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It’s Good To Be Back Testing and Reviewing Yachts for Major Magazines

GETTING OUT ON THE WATER IN YACHTS LIKE THE RIVIER ...

3 years ago · 1 min. reading time

Golden Advice for Developing and Managing New-Build Yacht Projects

THE UPDATED AND EXPANDED SECOND EDITION OF THIS WE ...

3 years ago · 2 min. reading time

Golden Advice for Successful Yacht Refits

HEADED TO THE YARD FOR A REFIT? AVOID THE SHOALS O ...