Phil Friedman

4 years ago · 4 min. reading time · visibility 0 ·

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A Look At My Personal Collection (Updated)

A Look At My Personal Collection (Updated)

ACQUIRING ORIGINAL ART DOES NOT REQUIRE SPENDING A FORTUNE... IF YOU'RE PATIENT AND BUY WHAT YOU LIKE FROM RELATIVE UNKNOWNS...


Preface:  One of the things that beBee does best is to provide a social media platform where business people and professionals show their more personal sides. This is one of mine. Someone once said the art which a person collects offers a window into their psyche  ― or at least should have said it.


The heading image seen above is of a four-panel, hand-painted Japanese silkscreen, approximately 72" wide overall by 34" high, circa 1950. Acquired from a Tokyo art dealer.



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This acrylic on canvas by musician and painter, Jeff Laibson, of Miami, contains a playable score. Acquired directly from the artist.


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Eclecticism as a theme in art appreciation...  This painting by Ethiopian artist Wosene Worke Kosrof exhibits a variety of influences, melded to produce its own unique character.


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Not all art hangs on walls. The provenance of this hand-painted cabinet — whose hinges are wooden with the only metal being hammered drawer handles and door escutcheons — is not entirely clear, acquired from a couple of returning foreign service diplomatic employees who purchased it in rural northern China.


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Not every piece of art that hangs on a wall is a painting. This collage is by artist Jo Nelson of Hastings, Nebraska, USA. It blends East Asian and Native American overtones. Note the genuine mah jong tile incorporated into the composition, a signature touch of Nelson's.


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This piece is a change of pace for us. It caught our notice because our daughters ride and love horses so much and because it was so striking in its literally photo-realistic appearance, right down to the hair on the horses. And it captures the spirit of the herd. Look closely, though, for it is actually a pencil drawing.  (Yes, you also do see a ghost image in the covering glass due to my lack of skill as a photographer.)


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To demonstrate the range of my wife's and my eclecticism, I thought I'd add this abstract piece by a Korean-American artist to the queue. The photo image does not do full justice to the vibrant colors of this unique painting, which shows to my eye the hint of the influence of Mondrian.  Acquired directly from the artist, 2001.


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Not all art is gratifying on a purely aesthetic basis. Some art is utilitarian as well and straddles the line between art and craft. This 60" wide Campaign Desk is built of ribbon-striped Mahogany with Maple burl inlays. Antique? Not exactly Designed by Phil Friedman and built by AeroLite Marine Interiors (2008)


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Lithographic impressions are considered originals in the Art World. This impression was taken by the Louvre Museum in Paris from the original plates created by the artist in the mid-1850s. Note the embossed Louvre seal at the bottom. 


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This piece sits on my living room coffee table. It is actually a maquette for an 80-foot high, polished stainless steel sculpture that has never been executed full size. It is both simple and complex in that it's detail comes from the fact it reflects its surroundings in multiple planes. Intended to be placed in green space in a park or quad among office towers. I loved it at first sight, but the artist would not part with it. So I married her.


Postscript: This particular post is itself a work in progress. Additional images from my personal art collection will continue to be added. So if you enjoyed these, please do feel free to check back periodically to see the others.  

  Phil Friedman


Author's Notes:  If you found this post interesting and worthwhile and would like to receive notifications of my writings on a regular basis, click the [FOLLOW] button on my beBee profile. Better yet, elect there to follow my blog by email. As a writer-friend of mine says, you can always change your mind later.

Should you be curious about some of my other writings on social media, you're invited to take a look at the following:

"On Trees, Trolls, Trust and Truth" 

"Self-Ascription, Self-Certification, and Snake Oil"

"BeBee vs beBee: Differentiation Thru Conversation"

Please feel free to "like" and "share" this post and my other articles — whether on beBee, LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, or Google+, provided only that you credit me properly as the author, and include a live link to my original post.


About me, Phil FriedmanWith 30 some years background in the marine industry, I've worn numerous hats — as a yacht designer, boat builder, marine operations and business manager, marine industry consultant, marine marketing and communications specialist, yachting magazine writer and editor, yacht surveyor, and marine industry educator. I am also trained and experienced in interest-based negotiation and mediation.


Before writing comes thinking. (The optional-to-read pitch):
As a professional writer, editor, university educator, and speaker, with more than 1,000 print and digital publications, I've recently launched an online program for enhancing your expository writing: learn2engage — With Confidence. My mission is to help writers and would-be writers improve their thought and writing, master the logic of discussion, and strengthen their ability to deal with disagreement... all of which I have found to be natural precursors to improved writing.

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For more information, click on the image immediately above. To schedule an appointment for a free 1/2-hour consult email: info@learn2engage.org. I look forward to speaking with you soon.


Text Copyright 2017 by Phil Friedman  —  All Rights Reserved
Image Credits: Phil Friedman, Google Images, and FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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Comments
Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #10

#12
Thanks for the tips, Wayne. The problem with the filter is that I am using an iPhone. When the photographic world went digital, I never replaced my Olympus SLR, which had done yeoman service when I was a yachting magazine editor because it could be programmed to automatically bracket all my shots and so made up for my lack of skill and knowledge. As to the shooting angle, it gets to be a compromise between eliminating the glare and reflections versus the distortion induced due to perspective. I could probably, if I asked, get help from my wife who is a fine arts graduate with a major in photography, but .... well, you know how that goes. :-)

Wayne Yoshida

Wayne Yoshida

4 years ago #9

#4
Phil Friedman - On the "glass thing" - there are two possible things to try: (a) Use a polarizing filter or (b) change the shooting angle.

Franci 🐝Eugenia Hoffman, beBee Brand Ambassador

We have a lot of art, most of it from my husband's side of the family. Most of it is wall hangings and bronze statutes. We should take the time to appreciate it more than we do. Between the two of us, we have moved numerous times and I am grateful the art has survived, thus far.

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #7

#9
You might not have guessed before, but in the right circumstances I love to talk about how one can and should make art part of one's daily life. And how one's life greatly benefits from being among the works of art -- and the animals -- one truly loves. Thank you for the kind words.

Franci 🐝Eugenia Hoffman, beBee Brand Ambassador

You have a lovely art collection, Phil. Each piece has its own distinct personality and I can imagine each piece has a very special place in your home. I find it difficult to select a favorite because I like them all.

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #5

#7
Thank you, D-L, for the kind words. Your note reminded me that I have sitting on my dresser a piece that I use almost everyday -- a beautiful hand-made jewelry/what-not box crafted by an old friend of mine, Richard Hadeed, who lives in Trinidad and plies his craft/art still. I think that, when I get back from Taiwan, I will photograph the box and add the image to the queue here, as still another change in pace. Making my point, I think, that collecting pieces that you truly love and enjoy adds a worthwhile dimension to living. Thank you, my Caribbean friend. Cheers!

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #4

#5
I assure you, Jerry, that it is my pleasure. I would personally be fascinated to see some of your favorite pieces, as well as those of others outthere in beBee Land. Indeed, it would be great if we could gather a group (Hive) for those of us who are collectors and appreciators of original art works for the joy they bring to our lives and not for the investment profits we hope to make. And if we could by doing so, generate some interest among others who have felt that such art is beyond the means of ordinary people, so much the better. Cheers! PS-I just added a piece to this post.

Jerry Fletcher

Jerry Fletcher

4 years ago #3

Thank you Phil. You gave me the incentive to walk through my home to see the number and style of originals I have. Like you I've picked items up over the years for the sheer joy they bring. And thank you, too for showing us a way to "open the kimono."

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #2

#1
#2 Thank you for the kind words, Pam. And for the offer to start a general art hive. Unfortunately, or perhaps fortunately, I have too much on my plate now to pay proper attention to creating and nurturing a new hive. I'd be pleased, however, to support someone else who might do it. For one of my motivations in posting these images is to encourage just that development. Cheers! PS - I guess I need to ask @Matt Sweetwood how to avoid ghosts when shooting through glass in a picture frame.

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #1

#1
#2 Thank you for the kind words, Pam. And for the offer to start a general art hive. Unfortunately, or perhaps fortunately, I have too much on my plate now to pay proper attention to creating and nurturing a new hive. I'd be pleased, however, to support someone else who might do it. For one of my motivations in posting these images is to encourage just that development. Cheers!